Nigerian Aso oke fabric Iborun (Yoruba Woman's Shawl)

Artwork
Identifier:
2021.53.5
Artist:
Artist Unknown
Credit:
Gift of Barbara Paxon
Medium:
Handwoven and Dyed Fabric
Date:
circa 1960
Dimensions:
Artworks - Height: 21" Width: 74"
Description:
Olive green fabric with gree, blue and yellow woven tufts in stripes. Fringe on each shorter end.Made on a broadloom.
Historical Context:
Aso oke fabric, (Yoruba: pronounced ah-SHAW-okay) is a hand-woven cloth created by the Yoruba people of west Africa. Usually woven by men and women, the fabric is used to make men's gowns, called agbada and hats, called fila, as well as women's wrappers, called iro and head tie, called gele. The way of making the cloth has remained the same for centuries, however new techniques and production methods have been looked into to eliminate the weight and thickness of the aso oke cloth, and to make it more accessible for casual wear.